Persecution Fridays – Eritrea

July 1, 2011 at 6:30 am | Posted in VOM Fridays | Leave a comment
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For more news on what’s really happening to Christians around the world go to the Voice of the Martyrs website: www.persecution.com

Eritrea: Unimaginable Suffering

Eritrean Christians fleeing persecution often face appalling conditions in Egypt, according to a report on the Christian Today website. The report cites The Barnabas Fund as saying that Egypt is the most common destination for Christians escaping from Eritrea, one of the most hostile countries in the world for believers. The Eritrean government sees Christians and evangelicals as a threat to national security because of their allegiance to God over the state. Continue Reading Persecution Fridays – Eritrea…

Genesis 12: 1-9

June 13, 2011 at 11:06 am | Posted in Bible Study | Leave a comment
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Now the LORD said to Abram, “Go forth from your country, And from your relatives And from your father’s house, To the land which I will show you; And I will make you a great nation, And I will bless you, And make your name great; And so you shall be a blessing; And I will bless those who bless you, And the one who curses you I will curse. And in you all the families of the earth will be blessed.” So Abram went forth as the LORD had spoken to him; and Lot went with him. Now Abram was seventy-five years old when he departed from Haran. Abram took Sarai his wife and Lot his nephew, and all their possessions which they had accumulated, and the persons which they had acquired in Haran, and they set out for the land of Canaan; thus they came to the land of Canaan. Abram passed through the land as far as the site of Shechem, to the oak of Moreh. Now the Canaanite was then in the land. The LORD appeared to Abram and said, “To your descendants I will give this land.” So he built an altar there to the LORD who had appeared to him. Then he proceeded from there to the mountain on the east of Bethel, and pitched his tent, with Bethel on the west and Ai on the east; and there he built an altar to the LORD and called upon the name of the LORD. Abram journeyed on, continuing toward the Negev.

We have looked at the Creation of the world, how man fell from perfection and grace and ushered sin into the world, how the world grew to be filled with so much violence that God brought a global Flood to destroy all but one family of eight people, how the descendants of these people rebelled against God by building a tower and were scattered through the confusion of languages. We have followed the line of Adam/Noah from the beginning and have narrowed it down along the way to the descendants of Terah. Now, we will narrow it a little more to focus on Abram.

As we begin chapter 12 of Genesis, it is important to remember what has happened. Abram’s father Terah has moved from Ur of the Chaldeans with his family (except Haran who died in Ur) to the city of Haran (coincidence?). They were on their way to enter the land of Canaan, but Terah died in the city of Haran. At some time while Abram was in Haran, the Lord God spoke to Abram and told him to leave his country and his father’s house and go to the land that He would show him. He then makes a promise to Abram that He will make Abram a great nation, will bless him, and make his name great. God says that in Abram, all families of the earth will be blessed.

Immediately, we see that Abram obeyed God and went forth out of Haran toward Canaan; and Lot went with him. This will be a problem later. We then find out a little bit of information about Abram. He was seventy-five years old, had his wife Sarai and he nephew Lot and all their possessions (including slaves) and set out for the land of Canaan. He enters the land of Canaan and goes as far as Shechem and the oak of Moreh. As he rests in Shechem, God appears to him and reiterates the promise that He gave Abram in Haran. The land is promised to Abram’s descendants, which he doesn’t have at this point (75 years old).

Abram’s immediate response is to build an altar to the Lord that he doesn’t know intimately yet. He then leaves Shechem and goes toward Bethel where he rests again and pitches his tent. On his west is the city of Bethel. On his east is the city of Ai. As he pitches his tent, he builds another altar to the Lord and then calls on His name. I think that it is interesting that Abram calls on the name of the Lord. It makes me wonder what all went on with the Lord up to this point. Was part of this because Terah taught him to do this? Was it something passed on from Shem? We don’t know. The only other time that the phrase “call upon the name of the Lord” is used up to this point is when scripture talks about Seth and his descendants doing the same thing. For whatever reason, Abram reveres God to the point that he builds him an altar in a few places (a way of worship) and calls on the name of the Lord. After this, we end up with Abram journeying on from Bethel to the Negev. The Negev is a region in Southern Israel close to Egypt. It is here that we will leave Abram for this week.

As we continue our look at the life of the father of the Jews and a friend of God, we will find out things about God and ourselves as well! Please join us next week as we continue our look at Abram!

 

Sermon Sunday – George Whitefield – Christ, the Believer’s Husband

June 5, 2011 at 8:34 am | Posted in Sermon Sunday | Leave a comment
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Christ the Believer’s Husband
by
George Whitefield
(1714-1770)

Isaiah 54:5 – “For thy Maker is thy Husband.”

Although believers by nature, are far from God, and children of wrath, even as others, yet it is amazing to think how nigh they are brought to him again by the blood of Jesus Christ. Eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, neither hath it entered into the heart of any man living, fully to conceive, the nearness and dearness of that relation, in which they stand to their common head. He is not ashamed to call them brethren. Behold, says the blessed Jesus in the days of his flesh, “my mother and my brethren.” And again after his resurrection, “go tell my brethren.” Nay sometimes he is pleased to term believers his friends. “Henceforth call I you no longer servants, but friends.” “Our friend Lazarus sleepeth.” And what is a friend? Why there is a friend that is nearer than a brother, nay as near as one’s own soul. And “thy friend, (says God in the book of Deuteronomy) which is as thy own soul.” Kind and endearing applications these, that undoubtedly bespeak a very near and ineffably intimate union between the Lord Jesus and the true living members of his mystical body! But, methinks, the words of our text point out to us a relation, which not only comprehends, but in respect to nearness and dearness , exceeds all other relations whatsoever. I mean that of a Husband, “For thy Maker is thy husband; the Lord of Hosts is his name; and thy Redeemer the Holy One of Israel, the God of the whole earth shall he be called.” Continue Reading Sermon Sunday – George Whitefield – Christ, the Believer’s Husband…

Design of the Week – World’s Greatest Abba

June 1, 2011 at 9:03 am | Posted in Designs of the Week | Leave a comment
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This week, we are reviving the Design of the Week posts. We start off with a design for Father’s Day called World’s Greatest Abba.
The word Abba means “father” in Hebrew. It is a term of endearment and one that the New Testament says that Christians can use of God the Father. It implies adoption by Him through repentance and faith. Here is the definition from Fausset:

The Chaldaic-Hebrew form, as ab is the Hebrew form, for the Greek pater, “father.” Instead of the definite article which the Hebrew uses before the word, the Chaldee or Aramaic adds a syllable to the end, producing thus the emphatic or definitive form. It is used to express a vocative case, and therefore is found in all the passages in which it occurs in the New Testament (being in all, an invocation): Mar_14:36; Rom_8:15; Gal_4:6.
The use of the Hebrew and of the Greek appellation addressed to the one Father beautifully suggests that the Spirit of adoption from Jesus, who first used the double invocation, inspires in both Jew and Gentile alike the experimental knowledge of God as our Father, because He is Father of Jesus with whom faith makes us one, and as our God because He is Jesus’ God. Compare Joh_20:17, “ascend unto My Father and (therefore) your Father. and to My God and (therefore) your God”; Gal_3:28, “there is neither Jew nor Greek, for ye are all one in Jesus Christ”; Eph_2:18, “through Him we both have access by one Spirit unto the leather.” (Especially (See ABADDON above.) “Abba” was a title not to be used by slaves to a master, nor Imma to a mistress, only by children: see Isa_8:4. “Before the child shall have knowledge to cry Abi, Immi.”

It is an awesome thing to know that, while God is holy, just, and righteous; He is also a Father to those who are His. We can draw strength from Him and run to Him when we are in trouble. This is the greatest comfort when trials and tribulations come!

Sermon Sunday: Charles Spurgeon

April 3, 2011 at 7:48 am | Posted in Sermon Sunday | 2 Comments
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Delivered on Sabbath Morning, January 7th, 1855, by the
REV. C. H. Spurgeon
At New Park Street Chapel, Southwark.

“I am the Lord, I change not; therefore ye sons of Jacob are not consumed.”—Malachi 3:6

It has been said by some one that “the proper study of mankind is man.” I will not oppose the idea, but I believe it is equally true that the proper study of God’s elect is God; the proper study of a Christian is the Godhead. The highest science, the loftiest speculation, the mightiest philosophy, which can ever engage the attention of a child of God, is the name, the nature, the person, the work, the doings, and the existence of the great God whom he calls his Father. There is something exceedingly improving to the mind in a contemplation of the Divinity. It is a subject so vast, that all our thoughts are lost in its immensity; so deep, that our pride is drowned in its infinity. Other subjects we can compass and grapple with; in them we feel a kind of self-content, and go our way with the thought, “Behold I am wise.” But when we come to this master-science, finding that our plumb-line cannot sound its depth, and that our eagle eye cannot see its height, we turn away with the thought, that vain man would be wise, but he is like a wild ass’s colt; and with the solemn exclamation, “I am but of yesterday, and know nothing.” No subject of contemplation will tend more to humble the mind, than thoughts of God. We shall be obliged to feel— Continue Reading Sermon Sunday: Charles Spurgeon…

Newslinks 06/20/10

June 20, 2010 at 1:25 pm | Posted in Newslinks | Leave a comment
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Sunday’s Newslinks brought to you by At Ease Tees

Papers Reveal Kagan’s Thoughts on Partial-Birth Abortion, Religious Freedom
As a Clinton White House counsel, Solicitor General Elena Kagan said she felt it was best to let doctors decide when a “so-called partial-birth [abortion] procedure” was necessary.

Fla. Gov. Vetoes Pro-Life Bill

Christian Health Care Sharing Requires More Than Religion

Defending Christianity’s Place in U.S. Against ‘Anti-Faith’ Attacks

Pope Ends Year for Priests With Apology for Abuse Scandal

Salem Web Network Acquires GodTube.com, Tangle.com

Carter’s method still ineffective, says analyst
A national defense analyst and former State Department official to the Bush administration says Barack Obama is on the road to re-Carterizing America.

Homegrown terrorist threats
A homeland security expert thinks Americans should be concerned with the increase in the number of U.S. citizens being radicalized” to Islam, often with a Somali connection.

Perspective: Slouching towards jihad
Why is it that Americans suffer the foolishness of political correctness that tells us we should celebrate the growth of Islam here in America? Continue Reading Newslinks 06/20/10…

What has God done for me?

March 29, 2010 at 2:46 pm | Posted in Christianity | Leave a comment
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Many people today, inside and outside the church, have become focused on self. They are all about them and what they can do. They often don’t know or care what God has done for them. Those who aren’t professing Christians can’t see that their very life is a gift from God. Sadly, this affects the gospel. When people don’t understand what God has done for them or why He did it, is cheapens the gospel and lessens the effect the good news can have in a person’s life. When pastors don’t preach the true gospel, the people listening don’t receive what they need to hear to help them understand who God is and what He’s done for them. Continue Reading What has God done for me?…


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